Will businesses of the future trade on the past?

Many established businesses dreaded the advent of online trade. They feared that the sheer scale of products and services available on the internet would result in high streets being replaced by a few behemoth warehouse operations.

While it's clear that internet shopping has had a profound impact on consumer habits, according to an article on CityLab the online domain is also causing a renaissance in certain old-fashioned areas of the economy. It turns out that when the internet offers shoppers anything they want, a substantial percentage want a more convenient way to access what they used to have.

Take milk delivery for example. The milkman with his pony and trap or electric buggy used to be a common sight in our streets. In 1963, around 30% of US consumers had milk delivered directly to their homes. Big stores and automobiles led people to favour buying milk in big stores instead; by 1975 only 6.9% used milkmen and in 2005 the figure was just 0.4%.

However, in the modern age nostalgic consumers are rediscovering the joy of home delivery. Supermarkets and online giants such as Amazon has long since discovered the appeal of offering consumers goods on their doorstep. Now smaller businesses are getting in on the act.

An Irish start-up called My Milkman has launched an app allowing users to order milk from a local supplier. Similar niche on-demand businesses are springing up elsewhere - in Stamford, Connecticut you can order a traditional barber to call at your home or office to deliver a trim or shave.

Alex Gomberg is another entrepreneur harnessing the nostalgia boom. He founded the Brooklyn Seltzer Boys in 2013, delivering carbonated water in hand-blown blue and green glass bottles stacked in traditional wooden crates. As the sole survivor of a once-thriving New York soda industry, the seltzer industry has a unique selling point for retro-loving customers.

Are heritage industries going to become the latest trend? We could be seeing a lot more traditional revivals fuelled by technology.